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Folk & Jazz fan, specialising in vinyl restoration. Although I would prefer to only post albums that I have paid for, or those of close friends, I am open to suggestions and offers of rare Folk items that need tender care and restoration, provided the supplier has the right of ownership of the physical item. NOT JUST an MP3 COPY of it. To give you an idea, I am prepared to restore vinyl belonging to another person, IF I receive a decent quality scan of the front, back and any relevant information that comes with the LP, preferably at least 2400 by 2400 quality, (600DPI scans for back) along with the sound files in FLAC format as waves are a bit too large to transfer. Then I will check their suitability for restoration. I try to maintain the requirement for a decent set of scans for each item, where possible, as I feel the music is incomplete without it. Sometimes this is just not possible as a lot of my stock came from broadcasting organisations that had their own heavy card sleeves, with information relevant to their prime function, that of providing the disc-jockies with basic details to pass on to listeners. I do wonder what happened to all the original artwork?

Sunday, 4 July 2010

Avoiding CLIPPING (Overload) on Vinyl ripping



 



Recently there has been some discussion on one of the blogs I visit about sound clipping and the distortion it causes to the music. There are many examples of badly done Vinyl rips, leaving aside the obvious problems of old, dirty and worn records, which only allow certain levels of improvement, there is one fundamental that should be firmly understood that of LOUDNESS when encoding from analogue to digital.  Digital recording is just a bucket of bits, once the bucket is filled, any more filling is lost over the side NEVER to be heard of again.  This is a simple analogy as although it would appear that what falls out of the bucket cannot be heard, this is not actually true, the effect of the bits falling out leaves behind unwanted bits, mixed up with the wanted bits... DISTORTION !!

The picture that saves a thousand words (I hope) ..
  
Click on the picture to magnify it for printing/reading

So, next time you consider turning one of your precious vinyl's into something DIGITAL please take care to do it to the best possible quality with the equipment you have available, most will have a record VOLUME control, please USE IT !! (CAREFULLY)

To assist you in getting the ripping levels right, here are some useful utilities.

Retro Style Analogue meters


These are available from the excellent VU-Player site   HERE


Then the Professional style Broadcast Peak Program Meters (PPMS)


These meters and others can be downloaded from  HERE


Both these meter programs are compatible with Windows 98/XP/Vista
There are enhanced versions that run only with Windows 7.

I have no connection with either of the programmers, I just want to spread the word because I have used them both to great advantage and am grateful to them for their labours.

 Now the words you all wanted to read... They are FREE
However donations are accepted.

Technical Words

These programs use your sound card to monitor the current audio stream, they can be set to monitor recording and playback, by making the correct selections on your audio mixer settings. Most computers have a "What You Hear" option, with this enabled, the meters will show exactly what you are listening to, the RETRO meters can be quite a talking point.


 

1 comment:

Paul the Stockman said...

Yes, this warning is highly relevant. The major fault I find with contributions is a failure to control the volume input when copying LP and cassette recordings across to other media resulting in clipping to such an extent that the material is unfit for publishing even with "unclipping" utilities.